Friday, February 5, 2016

BOMBSHELL! POPE BENEDICT XVI INVOLVED IN ARRANGING HISTORIC MEETING OF PATRIARCH KIRILL WITH POPE FRANCIS!



Crux (and you can read the entire article HERE) is reporting the important role of Pope Benedict XVI in arranging the meeting with Patriarch Kirill!

Here is the important passage:

Archbishop Georg Gänswein, the personal secretary of emeritus Pope Benedict XVI, told reporters on Friday that the retired pontiff was informed of the upcoming meeting, saying Benedict called it a “historic encounter, a historic step.”

Gänswein said Benedict and Kirill know each other well from when the future pope was still the Vatican’s top doctrinal official, and the Russian Orthodox cleric was a metropolitan. According to Gänswein, one of Benedict’s first meetings after his election to the papacy was with Kirill at the Domus Santa Marta, the hotel where Francis now lives.

Benedict helped lay the groundwork for the upcoming meeting, Gänswein said, adding that by adding new “columns” and “pillars,” Francis has helped “build the house.”

Here is some important background information that you won't likely hear from the Orthodox themselves:

Both St. John Paul II and emeritus Pope Benedict XVI tried holding this meeting in Moscow, but it never came to be. One obstacle was the belief by Russian religious leaders that the Catholic Church was trying to convert Orthodox faithful in what Orthodox leaders considered their territory.

Yet a study in 2002 found there were just 800 conversions in the entire decade of the 1990s. Meanwhile, Evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity exploded in Russia, so much so that a 2012 book referred to it as a “post-Soviet gold rush.”

In the 2000s, in another sign of appeasement, the Vatican imposed an informal “no-growth” policy, instructing pastors to tell any Russian who wanted to become Catholic to go back to their Orthodox parish.

Far from expanding, Catholicism shrunk, in part because many ethnic Germans and Poles left Russia.

The Russian Orthodox have also consistently vetoed a papal trip to the country, making Moscow one of just a handful of places, including Beijing and Pyongyang, where the pope is not welcome.

THE CHURCHES OF THE EAST AND WEST IN UNION WITH THE SUCCESSOR OF SAINT PETER: THE CATHOLIC CHURCH OF THE EAST AND WEST TODAY!

The Catholic Church with both the spiritual and liturgical patrimony of the both the East and the West subsists under the authority of the Holy Roman Pontiff, the Successor of Saint Peter. Here is a succinct history of the different rites of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. Please note the Maronite Rite and Malabar Rite in particular, which is in Lebanon and India. These started in the East around the 4th Century and never went into schism with Peter not even in 1054! These never went into heresy either.

The Rites of the Catholic Church as described by Catholic News Agency:

It may surprise most people to know that there are many different rites within the Catholic Church. Before discussing these rites it is important to note that different sources disagree on exactly what constitutes a rite and exactly how many there are.

A rite represents an ecclesiastical tradition about how the sacraments are to be celebrated. As the early Church grew and spread, it celebrated the sacraments as would be best understood and received in the context of individual cultures, without ever changing their essential form and matter. The early Church sought to evangelize in the major cultural centers of the first centuries A.D. These centers were Rome, Antioch (Syria), and Alexandria (Egypt). All the rites in use today evolved from the liturgical practices and ecclesiastical organization used by the churches in these cities.

The Church of Christ represented in these ecclesiastical traditions is known as a ritual church. The church in a certain territory is known as a particular church.

The Catholic Encyclopedia describes the situation this way: "Within the Catholic Church ... Canonical rites, which are of equal dignity, enjoy the same rights, and are under the same obligations. Although the particular churches possess their own hierarchy, differ in liturgical and ecclesiastical discipline, and possess their own spiritual heritage, they are all entrusted to the pastoral government of the Roman pontiff, the divinely appointed successor of St. Peter in the Primacy.

The Catechism lists seven rites. These rites so listed: Latin, Byzantine, Alexandrian, Syriac, Armenian, Maronite, and Chaldean, 2 are actually families of liturgical expression. These rites are the descendants of the liturgical practices that originated in centers of Rome, Antioch, and Alexandria. Each will be discussed in turn.

LATIN. The Pope has several titles. He is the Bishop of Rome, Vicar of the universal Church, Primate of Italy; among others. As the Bishop of Rome he is the head of the Latin or Roman rite. This is by far the largest rite in the Church. It was founded by St. Peter in Rome around 42 A.D. The current Eucharistic liturgy was handed down more or less intact from at least the 4th century. This was the liturgy used in Rome. There were other liturgies used in the West up to the Council of Trent (1526-1570). After the Council of Trent only the Roman liturgy could be used. The only exceptions were liturgical practices that were more than 200 years old.

The Pope is also vicar of these other liturgical rites that date from before the Council of Trent. These rites include the Mozarabic rite from Spain, the Ambrosian rite from Milan, Italy, named after St. Ambrose (340-397), the Bragan rite from Portugal, and the order liturgies of the Dominican, Carmelite, and Carthusian orders.

As Vicar of the universal Church, the Pope is shepherd of the rites of the West and the East. The eastern rites which have a separate code of canon law, are completely equal in dignity with the rites of the West. All of these eastern ritual churches come under the jurisdiction of the Pope through the Congregation for the Oriental Churches, one of the offices of the Roman Curia. The rites are administered by either a Patriarch, a Major Archbishop, a Metropolitan, or have some other arrangement. Patriarchs are elected by a synod of bishops of their rite, and then request ecclesiastical communion from the Pope. Major Archbishops are also elected by a synod of bishops of their rite, but then are approved by the Pope before they take office. Metropolitans are picked by the Pope from a list given by a synod of bishops.

BYZANTINE. The largest of these eastern rites is the Byzantine. The Byzantine liturgy is based on liturgy developed by St. James for the Antiochaian church, but modified by St. Basil (329-379) and St. John Chrysostom (344-407). This liturgy is similar if not identical to the liturgy used by the Orthodox churches. After the schism between the churches in Rome and Constantinople in 1054, many particular churches remained separated from Rome. Over the years some of these churches came back into union. These churches after they returned to the fold have generally been treated as separate rites based on their particular location, even though they have similar if not identical liturgy. The churches using the Byzantine liturgy include the Albanian, Belarussian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Greek, Hungarian, Italo-Albanian, Melkite, Romanian, Russian, Ruthenian, Slovak, and Ukrainian.

ALEXANDRIAN. The liturgy used by the church in Alexandria in Egypt is attributed to St. Mark the evangelist. This church became known as the Coptic church because Copt is the Arabic and Greek word for Egyptian. Before the Moslem invasion in 641 the Copts fell into heresy due to their rejection of the Council of Chalcedon (451). Through missionary work, some of these were brought back into union in recent years. Today there exists in Egypt the Coptic rite which is Orthodox and the Coptic rite that is loyal to the Bishop of Rome.

The Ge'ez rite based in Ethiopia is closely associated with the Coptic rite. Missionaries from Alexandria spread the faith in Ethiopia in the 4th century. The native language (Ge'ez) was used instead of Greek in the liturgy. The church in Ethiopia also fell into heresy after the Council of Chalcedon but was brought back through missionary efforts in the past few centuries. This is a very recently defined rite since the Metropolitan See was only established in 1961.

SYRIAC. The liturgy of the Syriac rite is attributed to St. James the Apostle. This liturgy was used by the church in Antioch in present day Syria. Many bishops in this area also broke away after the Council of Chalcedon. They stopped using Greek and used the Syriac language in their liturgy. The Syriac language is similar to Aramaic, the language Jesus spoke. Through the work of Jesuit and Capuchin missionaries many members of this rite returned to union with Rome, including the Patriarch of this rite in 1781.

The Malankarese rite developed in India. They trace their Christian lineage to St. Thomas the Apostle who traveled to South India and founded a church. This rite was in union with the Assyrian (Chaldean) church which had fallen into the Nestorian heresy after the Council of Ephesus in 431. This church was "discovered" by Portuguese missionaries in the 16th century. After attempts to "latinize" the rite, many broke away to form their own rite under the control of the Syrian Patriarch. In the 1920's and 30's four bishops of this rite were reunited with Rome, and many members of their rite followed. This rite is located in Kerala State, India.

ARMENIAN. Armenia was the first country to adopt Christianity as the state religion in the 4th century. They used the Antiochine liturgy of St. James said in the Armenian language. At that time Armenia was located in eastern Turkey. After it was destroyed in the 11th century it moved to Cilicia (southern Turkey). That is why to this day the Patriarch of this rite is known as the Patriarch of Cilicia of the Armenians. The Armenians also fell into heresy after the Council of Chalcedon. The Council of Florence in 1439 declared reunion with the Armenians, and Pope Benedict XIV confirmed the first Patriarch in 1742. The Turks massacred roughly two million Armenians at the end of World War I. Most members of this rite live in Lebanon.

MARONITE. The Maronite rite traces its origins to the work of St. Maron in the 4th century who founded a monastery east of Antioch. Later monks moved to the mountains in what is today Lebanon. This rite never fell into heresy and was only separated from Rome by the political reality of Moslem or Ottoman occupation. The Maronites use a hybrid liturgy based on the Antiochian St. James. Maronites make up 17% of the population of Lebanon and by the law of that country the president of Lebanon is always a Maronite.

CHALDEAN. The people in modern day Iran and Iraq were once known as the Assyrians. The church established itself there very early but the people in this area fell into the heresy of Nestorianism in the 5th century. After missionary efforts many returned to union with Rome, and in 1553 Pope Julius III proclaimed the first Patriarch of the Chaldeans. Chaldean is the biblical term used for those from Babylon. Today the Patriarch of this rite located in Bagdad, Iraq where most of the members of this rite live.

SYRO-MALABAR: The Malabar rite is based in India. Its members are descendants of the Thomas Christians and could be called a brother rite to the Malankarese. The Malabar rite never broke with Rome despite the conflict with the Portuguese in the 16th century. They are generally grouped with the Chaldean family of rites because the Assyrian (later called Chaldean) church provided their bishops until the Portuguese took over that task. Also their liturgy was originally in the Syriac language which the Chaldean church used. Although an ancient rite, it had no single administrator until Pope John Paul II appointed a Major Archbishop in 1992.

All the rites of the Catholic Church are of equal dignity and equally valid. Attendance at a different rite fulfills the Sunday obligation. The Catholic Church is truly universal since it unites so many diverse rites, whose members share a common faith.

YES, WE MUST DISMISS ATTEMPTS TO PIT ONE ONE AGAINST ANOTHER!

HAVEN'T I BEEN SAYING THIS ALL ALONG! IT'S THE MEDIA, ESPECIALLY SCHISMATIC-LIKE BLOGS PROPAGATING THE RUPTURE BETWEEN B AND F!

During a visit to the US, the prefect of the CDF offered a reflection on "Deus Caritas Est" and dismissed attempts to pit one pope against another.
Cardinal Gerhard Müller at a press conference in Rome in February 2014. (CNS photo/Max Rossi, Reuters)

Cardinal Gerhard Müller, during a rare visit to the United States this week, emphasized the continuity between Pope Francis and his predecessor Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, especially with regard to the Church’s teaching on mercy and its relation to justice and truth.

The prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith was in Houston, Texas for the episcopal ordination of Bishop Steven J. Lopes as the first bishop for the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. On Monday, February 1, the evening before the ordination, Cardinal Müller gave an address at Houston’s University of St. Thomas on “Mercy and Truth in Deus Caritas Est.”

In his theological reflection on the 2005 encyclical by Pope Benedict, Cardinal Müller examined what he described as two great obstacles to evangelization: rationalism and emotionalism, both of which he said “derive from a lack of knowledge of the cognitive nature of love.” On the one hand, rationalism “refuses love as a source of knowledge and relegates it to a position of subjective or private affection”; on the other, emotionalism is “a wide-ranging phenomenon that transmits a vague irrationalism to the religious experience.” In Deus Caritas Est, Cardinal Müller said, Pope Benedict seeks to address these two extremes and makes the “immensely courageous” assertion that love is the source of all truth.

“These are the two major affirmations of Christianity in which love is involved: knowing God in one’s heart; and the loving manner in which human beings recognize this mystery,” the cardinal said.

That love is a kind of knowledge and the source of truth doesn’t mean it belongs to a purely theoretical realm, Cardinal Müller explained. In fact, “it is impossible to separate the theological knowledge of God from the pastoral works of the Church. …This is the reason why the Holy Father’s focus in writing this encyclical is evangelization, as is understood from his very words: ‘To experience love and in this way to cause the light of God to enter into the world.’”

In discussing the “fundamental dynamism” of justice, truth, and mercy, Cardinal Müller said, “The logic of mercy does not justify man through the possibility of introducing exceptions to a law that is excessively severe, as if it were to refuse its truth; rather, it offers the sense of an excess that regenerates. This occurs particularly when forgiveness reconciles the person gratuitously and makes him capable of living the Covenant with God.”

When asked about how he sees Pope Francis developing the theme of mercy as laid out by Pope Benedict, Cardinal Müller dismissed what he characterized as media-fueled interpretations that look for contradictions between the two popes.

“We can say, surely, Pope Benedict was more a teacher of theology and Pope Francis is more a pastor, but this is not a contradiction because Jesus in his own person was teacher of the truth and also the good pastor,” Cardinal Müller said. “Every pope has the right and duty to fulfill with his own person, his own characteristics, the Petrine service.”

“Pope Francis has his charism to invite personally the people to come to look to the mercy of God,” the cardinal continued. “We are invited personally with the love of God to change our lives, to become a new creation in Jesus Christ. I think that is the big message of Pope Francis, but it is in full continuity with Pope Benedict. We can say Pope Benedict is great in the doctrine, and Pope Francis is great in the pastoral realization of this message. And it is not just the message of Pope Benedict, it is the message of the Gospel.”

THIS IS TRULY TRAGIC ON MANY LEVELS BUT MUST BE FILED UNDER "JUST TOO COOL!" IT WOULD MAKE A GREAT LIFETIME MOVIE

Wife crashes her own funeral, horrifying her husband, who had paid to have her killed

Read the story at the Washington Post

I DON'T KNOW WHO DENIED THAT THIS WOULD ACTUALLY HAPPEN, BUT WHEN THIS WAS LEAKED IT WAS DENIED--BUT BY WHO, I ASK; YOU ANSWER!

LET IT BE KNOWN THAT THIS BOMBSHELL WAS FIRST REPORTED BY ME IMMEDIATELY AFTER IT WAS POSTED BY THE VATICAN AND BEFORE CNN ANNOUNCED IT! AM I GOOD OR WHAT?
(Vatican Radio) It was announced on Friday that Pope Francis will hold a meeting with Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia in Cuba on February 12th. It marks the first ever such meeting between a Roman Pontiff and the head of the Russian Orthodox Church.

Please find below the Joint Press Release of the Holy See and of the Patriarchate of Moscow:

The Holy See and the patriarchate of Moscow are pleased to announce that, by the grace of God, His Holiness Pope Francis and His Holiness Patriarch Kirilll of Moscow and All Russia will meet on February 12th next. Their meeting will take place in Cuba, where the Pope will make a stop on his way to Mexico, and where the Patriarch will be on an official visit. It will include a personal conversation at Havana’s Jose Marti International Airport, and will conclude with the signing of a joint declaration.

This meeting of the Primates of the Catholic Church and the Russian Orthodox Church, after a long preparation, will be the first in history and will mark an important stage in relations between the two Churches. The Holy See and the Moscow Patriarchate hope that it will also be a sign of hope for all people of good will. They invite all Christians to pray fervently for God to bless this meeting, that it may bear good fruits.

AND THEN WE HAVE THIS ABOUT FIRST IN ITS HISTORY PAN ORTHODOX COUNCIL CREATING FEAR AND TREPIDATION AMONG MANY ORTHODOX AND oRTHODOX:

Leading Orthodox theologian: forthcoming council is ‘extraordinary and exceptional event’

February 04, 2016

A leading Eastern Orthodox theologian has offered an overview of the upcoming Holy and Great Council of the Orthodox Church.

Writing in First Things (READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE THERE BY PRESSING HERE) Archdeacon John Chryssavgis said that the council, from the Orthodox point of view, is not properly described as an ecumenical council because “whole church that must convene—East and West—in order for a council to be considered ecumenical.”

At the same time, this “extraordinary and exceptional event” is “entirely without precedent in the history of Christianity,” wrote Chryssavgis, who serves as Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew’s theological advisor for environmental issues and was cited by Pope Francis in his ecological encyclical Laudato Si’.

“Some are afraid of [the council’s] consequences for the purity of Orthodox doctrine; it may shed light on practices in isolated communities, which have long resisted and reacted against the modern ways of the West,” Chryssavgis continued. “But others see this as a unique moment in the life and witness of an ancient church; it is an opportunity for Orthodox theology to speak a prophetic voice of hope and light in a time of anxiety and uncertainty.”

As Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew reminded the Orthodox primates gathered in Geneva last week, “this is the moment of Orthodoxy.” In the words of Archbishop Anastasios of Albania: “The great council is not a facsimile of an ecumenical council.” Whether described as an ecumenical council, or more aptly labeled a great council, the occasion in Crete next June is not just a new or another council; it is an extraordinary and exceptional event. It is meant to happen. The Spirit is moving. The world is waiting. Let’s see what transpires among the attending bishops.
John Chryssavgis is Archdeacon and theological advisor to Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew.

TODAY'S NEW LITURGICAL MOVEMENT A BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN EXPERIENCE WILL ECLIPSE IN SPEED THE OLD LITURGICAL MOVMENT THAT CULMINATED IN POPE PAUL VI'S REVISION OF THE ANCIENT MASS--PROGRESSIVES AND TRADITIONALISTS WILL HAVE TO DEAL WITH IT BECAUSE IT IS HAPPENING AT LIGHTENING SPEED FROM THE TOP DOWN AND THE BOTTOM UP!



This is an article in Rorate Caeli written by by Fr. Richard G. Cipolla, my comments at the end of it:

What is so sorely needed in the Church today is genuine theological debate about important issues both within the Church and also within the world. And this debate is sorely needed within the Traditional movement within the Church. What is at stake is the very concept and understanding of the Tradition of the Church that encompasses both Scripture and the teaching of the Church to the present time. For the Catholic, Scripture cannot be divorced from the Tradition, which must include the teaching of the Church and its binding nature.

You notice I did not invoke the term “Magisterium” with respect to the teaching office of the Church. The Magisterium, as understood today, did not, at least in an explicitly defined sense, exist before Vatican I. I would submit that the concept of the Magisterium as consisting of the Pope united with the bishops and the levels of Extraordinary and Ordinary teaching is a rather modern concept. This is not to say that this concept is in error or that it is not useful. But this understanding of the teaching role and office of the Church defined in this narrow and legalistic way impoverishes the meaning of the Ecclesia Docens by overlooking the role of the Liturgy and of the piety of the people in the teaching of the Church as embodied in the Tradition. The omission of the role of the Liturgy and the piety of the people in the concept of the Magisterium is one of the chief reasons why we find ourselves in the parlous situation of the Church today.

I am not aware of a groundswell of the faithful who asked for a new liturgy in the 1960s. What happened after Vatican II had little to do with the People of God. What happened was from the top down. It was the imposition of a rite on the people by liturgical brahmins of a certain time and place, with a certain flawed scholarship (as is all scholarship), with a certain breathless desire to be with the times: and this imposition was made possible by the belief that the Magisterium, and specifically the Pope, has the power and the authority to this.

And this is what must be debated among those who love the Church and her Tradition: what is the basis of this power and authority to essentially change the Tradition of the Church in the form of the Liturgy? In the case of the Pope, is it the definition of Papal Infallibility at Vatican I? Is it from the Catechism that speaks of the Extraordinary and Ordinary Magisterium with regard to the Pope and the bishops? When Pius X signed off on the radical revision of the Roman Breviary and promulgated the revision as the Roman Breviary (at least Paul VI called his revision by a new name), where did this authority come from? When Pius XII, despite his own warnings about archaism in liturgical scholarship, initiated the post-1955 Holy Week rites, what was the basis of the authority to change the Tradition embodied in the Liturgy? When Paul VI at the stroke of a pen brought a New Liturgy into Being and assumed that the Mass of the Tradition was now a thing of the past to be discarded and never to be part of the Church again, is this when this power and authority came into being? Was it when the Pope assumed the authority to change the words of Consecration on the basis of making them more biblical and eliminating “Mysterium Fidei” because no one understood why those words were there in the Consecration of the wine to the Precious Blood? Or was it when St. John XXIII decided to add St. Joseph to the Canon of the Mass? Who could object to this? But what was the basis of his authority to do such a thing? As the Chief Shepherd whose jurisdiction of the Church is absolute? And the further questions about the relationship of Canon Law to Liturgical Law and what the source and meaning of Liturgical Law is and its relationship to Tradition: all this needs to be talked about and debated in a faithful and intelligent manner.

Men and women who love the Tradition are now upset over Pope Francis’ edict that changes the rubrics of the Roman Missal of Paul VI to allow for the feet of women and girls to be washed as well as men and boys. My esteemed colleague, Augustinus, writing for Rorate Caeli, understands the latest development in the ongoing liturgical development that has marked the post-Vatican years as “inevitable” . And he is right. Just as Pope Francis is inevitable. But underlying this sense of inevitability is the profound legalism that undergirds the very understanding of the Liturgy itself.

There is no question of the need for liturgical law. But the fact is that liturgical law was powerless in the face of the innovation of saying Mass facing the people. It was powerless in the face of the un-Traditional practice of receiving Communion in the hand, a practice born in disobedience. It was powerless in the face of countless abuses in the Mass, abuses that still are part of the “normal” celebration of Mass today. And this is where I disagree with my colleague when he says: “As long as the ‘Reform of the Reform’ is not embodied in clear legislation that is vigorously enforced by the very top, it will never take off the ground and will never be more than the hobby of a tiny minority”.

I would say that surely those of us who love the Tradition and bemoan the present state of the liturgical life of the Church have learned that legislation of any type is not the answer. A bishop I know and respect said to me recently: “We are priests. We are not policemen.”. The breakdown of the liturgical life of the Church cannot be fixed by legislation. How it will be fixed is in the deepest sense by the sheer grace of God. How we can co-operate with this grace is a subject for conversation. But the most important thing right now is to initiate the debate about papal authority, its basis, its nature and its limits. And like all debate within the Church of Christ, it must be done by listening to each other in charity.

MY COMMENTS: 

1. Fr. Cipolla comes very close to his progressive counterparts by calling into question the authority of the Magisterium either ordinary or extraordinary as only a recent development that cracks the door for traditionalists who might have schismatic tendencies to dismiss the Magisterium altogether as progressives have done since the 1970's and rudely so. Liberal theologians of that period saw themselves as a parallel magisterium, the loyal opposition to this, that and the other. In a sense Fr. Cipolla attributes a similar magisterium to the Ecclesia Docens. This can get very divisive especially in parishes where there is a liturgical elitism among those who say they love Tradition and are the only correct worshipers. 

2. It is interesting that those who love Tradition would desire that a pope would one day simply eliminate the Ordinary Form of the Mass and impose the EF Mass on the entire Latin Rite in a top down fashion as the Ordinary Form was imposed on the Latin Rite Church.  Top down authority is desired only when convenient and in line with one's ideologies. Pope Francis while wanting a more synodal Church is a top down authoritarian. If he was traditionalist in the narrow sense, Fr. Cipolla would champion His Holiness. 

3. Things born of disobedience often come from the bottom up--altar girls, communion in the hand, the exploitation of Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion and washing the feet of women on Holy Thursday. It was a mix of negligence but also a desire of the clergy and the laity to have these things. But make no mistake, these came from parishes not from Rome. Rome simply endorsed what the clergy and laity were practicing. Is this not too the Ecclesia Docens but applied now to the development of the Ordinary Form? In two thousand years, what will be said about this in history and the present of 2000 years from now????

4. There is a new Liturgical movement post Vatican II. Progressives who idolize the Liturgical Movement of the first part of the 20th century that led to liturgical changes by Pope Pius XII and then accelerated by Vatican II and Pope Paul VI with Archbishop the liturgical anarchist as its engine, decry the New Liturgical Movement of Pope St. John Paul II accelerated by its engine, Cardinal Ratzinger who is Pope Benedict. Having two forms of the Latin Rite, and now the Ordinariate's Missal which is Pope Benedict's desired new third missal combing the best of the EF and OF and on many levels is the New Liturgical Movement that will influence the future and more quickly than the old Liturgical Movement influenced the Church top down or bottom up! 

 

Thursday, February 4, 2016

BISHOP STEVEN J. LOPES REMARKS FOLLOWING THE ORDINATION MASS USING THE NEW POST-VATICAN II MISSAL! HE RELATES POWERFUL WORDS FROM OUR HOLY FATHER, POPE FRANCIS!

 (I can't swear to this, but when I was on sabbatical in Rome in 2012, our group visited the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and an American priest-official working there gave us a tour and a lengthy presentation on what the congregation does. I think it might have been then Father Steven Lopes! I had the opportunity to ask him about the Anglican Ordinariate and its new missal at the time and wondered in my question if the Ordinary Form of the Latin Rite could have the EF additions that the Ordinariate Missal has given to us. As I recall the official said if the Ordinary Form has a bishop or cardinal advocate for it, sure!!!! As you know the approval of the Ordinariate Missal came not only from the Congregation for Divine Worship but also the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and then Pope Francis signed off on it!)

This is at the end of Mass when the newly ordained bishop circles around the nave offering his Episcopal blessing. The choir is absolutely fantastic and I presume what is sung is a great Anglican hymn!

I found this on YouTube but cannot find the entire Mass there. Does anyone out there know if the complete Mass is available?

ADORATION OR IMITATION OF CHRIST? IT'S NOT EITHER/OR BUT BOTH/AND (AND THE PROGRESSIVE CATHOLIC'S IDOLATRY OF VATICAN II WHEN THEY ACCLAIM THAT VATICAN II ISN'T IRREFORMABLE BECAUSE TO SAY SO TURNS VATICAN II INTO A gOD!)


I saw this silly comment  at another progressive liturgical blog:

Picking up on a theme of our traditionalist-leaning friends, what if we were to consider the Last Gospel. On a traditional Catholic site, I read a few days ago of a wish of restoring that element as part of the so-called mutual enrichment. What if, instead of John 1:1-14, the Last Gospel were Matthew 25:31-46?

Both passages draw us into a consideration of the Word Made Flesh. The TLM text invites reverence and awe. Matthew 25 hints at a different sort of encounter, a presence no less real, and one more intimately tied with the imitation of rather than the adoration of Christ.

My comment: Adoration of Christ in the "source and summit" of our Catholic life, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass leads us to the "Dismissal" and our "Imitation of Christ" in our real life wherever we find ourselves to include the church building and its premises. 

However, it is intriguing to do what the Ordinariate Missal once again allows and that is the reading of the Last Gospel and adding a few others to it such as Matthew 25! In fact, I see no problem in adding the Last Gospel without ecclesiastic approval since it isn't a part of the Mass and could be viewed as a post-Mass hymn, such as the Regina Caeli or Salve Regina or other Marian hymns at the end of Mass.

At the same progressive liturgical blog another comment indicated the ongoing  perpetuation of adoring Vatican II, a pastoral council, as some sort of god and thus turning it into an idol:

Those who want to go back to the early Liturgical Movement (prior to Vatican II in the early 20th century and with the Tridentine Mass) want to ignore the experience and growth and insights of about a century. And obviously, they reject the Second Vatican Council, which clearly did not want to go back to before WW2 and undo the previous 20 years, but called for a move forward. So the main question in all this, like in so many questions of liturgical reform, is: Does one accept Vatican II or not?

My comment: Of course this commenter wants to go back to the 1970's Missal and back to the dark ages of that same period when the Tridentine Mass now known as the EF Mass was supposedly suppressed. Of course it wasn't completely suppressed by Pope Paul VI who allowed it for certain situations and there was a more blanket approval of its use in England under the same pope.  But only 10 years or so after the 1970 missal, Pope St. John Paul II expanded the use of its celebration and of course Pope Benedict released it completely from bondage and the "museum" of history to allow it to become a living organism in the Church again.

And now the Holy Roman Catholic Church in 2015 was given a new Roman Missal approved by Pope Francis, "Divine Worship, the Missal" which is truly a post-Vatican II work of art that takes into account what Sacrosanctum Concilium actually requested without the ideologies of Archbishop Bugnini and his excesses and iconoclasm of the classic Roman Liturgy none of which can rightly be seen as a product of the Liturgical Movement of the early 1900's!

Vatican II like the Church is not irreformable and the Ordinariate's Missal is a sign of that as is the blanket allowance of the EF Mass today by Pope Benedict! To say that Vatican II isn't reformable because it is a god is idolatry!!!!!

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

THE ENGLISH ROMAN CANON OF THE DIVINE WORSHIP, THE MASS MISSAL OF THE ORDINARIATE

When I listened to Bishop Steven J. Lopes pray the Roman Canon using the exquisite Elizabethan translation, even though he was facing the congregation, it was clear that this was no ordinary speak, it was prayer directed to the Majesty of the Most Holy Trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It was stunningly beautiful hearing it. One had a sense of the sacred and the reverence demanded by so great a Prayer!

I can lament that our reformed Ordinary Form Mass let us down. If the Ordinariate's Missal had been the Post Vatican II reformed Missal and every Church took great care in praying it; I wonder if we wouldn't be in a better place today. We'll only know in eternity which has parallel time I presume. We need something to watch up there! We could spend a whole lifetime in parallel time of the "if only."

The Exquisite Roman Canon with Elizabethan English:

Therefore, most merciful Father, we humbly pray thee, through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord,

He may kiss the altar. Making then the Sign of the Cross over the bread and chalice together he says:

and we ask, that thou accept and bless these + gifts, these offerings, these holy and unblemished sacrifices. 

With hands extended, he continues: 

We offer them unto thee, first, for thy holy Catholic Church: that thou vouchsafe to keep her in peace, to guard, unite and govern her throughout the whole world; together with thy servant N. our Pope, N., our bishop (or N, our Ordinary), and all the faithful guardians of the catholic and apostolic faith. 

Commemoration of the Living

Remember, O Lord, thy servants and handmaid (N. and N.) 

The Priest joins his hands and prays briefly for those for whom he intends to pray; then with hands extended, he continues: 

and all who here around us stand, whose faith is known unto thee and their steadfastness manifest, on whose behalf we offer unto thee, or who themselves offer unto thee this sacrifice of praise; for themselves, and for all who are theirs; for the redemption of their souls, for the hope of their health and well-being; and who offer their prayers unto thee, the eternal God, the living and the true. 

Within the Action

 United in one communion, we venerate the memory, first of the glorious ever-Virgin Mary, Mother of our God and Lord Jesus Christ; of Blessed Joseph her spouse; as also of thy blessed Apostles and Martyrs, Peter and Paul, Andrew, James, John, Thomas, James, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Simon and Thaddeus, Linus, Cletus, Clement, Xystus, Cornelius, Cyprian, Lawrence, Chrysogonos, John and Paul, Cosmas and Damian, and all they Saints, grant that by their merits and prayers we may in all things be defended with the help of thy protection. (My comment: Please note the use of the name "Thaddeus" instead of Jude and also that it is not permissible to eliminate some of the names as is possible in the Ordinary Form of the same prayer!)

He joins his hands. 

(Through the same Christ, our Lord. Amen.)

With hands extended, he continues:

We beseech thee then, O Lord, graciously to accept this oblation from us thy servants, and from they whole family; order thou our days in they peace, and bid us to be delivered from eternal damnation, and to be numbered in the fold of thine elect. 

Holding his hands extended over the offerings, he says:

Vouchsafe, O God, we beseech thee, in all tings to make this oblation blessed, approved, and accepted, a perfect and worthy offering; that it may become for us the Body and Blood of thy dearly beloved Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. 

He joins his hands.

In the formulas that follow, the words of the Lord should be pronounced clearly and distinctly, as the nature of these words requires.
He takes the bread and, holding it slight raised above the altar, continues: 

Who the day before he suffered, took bread into his holy and venerable hands,

He raises his eyes.

and with eyes lifted up to heaven, unto thee, God, his almighty Father, giving thanks to thee, he blessed, broke and gave it to his disciples, saying:

He bows slightly,

TAKE THIS, ALL OF YOU, AND EAT OF IT: FOR THIS IS MY BODY, 
WHICH WILL BE GIVEN UP FOR YOU.

He genuflects, shows the consecrated Host to the People, places it on the paten, and again genuflects in adoration. Then he continues: 

Likewise, after supper,

He takes the chalice, and, raising it a little above the altar, continues:

taking also this goodly chalice into his holy and venerable hands, again giving thanks to thee, he blessed, and gave it to his disciples, saying:

He bows slightly.

TAKE THIS, ALL OF YOU, AND DRINK FROM IT, FOR THIS IS THE CHALICE OF MY BLOOD, 
THE BLOOD OF THE NEW AND ETERNAL COVENANT,
WHICH WILL BE POURED OUT FOR YOU AND FOR MANY
FOR THE FORGIVENESS OF SINS.
DO THIS IN MEMORY OF ME. 

He genuflects, shows the Chalice to the People, places it on the corporal, and again genuflects in adoration.

The mystery of faith:

And the People, or Choir, continue, acclaiming:

 We proclaim they Death, O Lord,
and profess thy Resurrection
until thou come again.

or this:

When we eat this Bread and drink this Cup, 
we proclaim thy Death, O Lord,
until thou come again.

or this:

O Saviour of the world,
who by thy Cross and precious Blood hast redeemed us:
save us and help us, we humbly beseech thee, O Lord.  

Then, with hands extended, the Priest says:

Wherefore, O Lord, we thy servants, and thy holy people also, remembering the blessed Passion of the same Christ thy Son our Lord, as also his Resurrection from the dead, and his glorious Ascension into heaven; do offer unto thine excellent majesty of thine own gifts and bounty, the pure victim, the holy victim, the immaculate victim, the holy Bread of eternal life, and the Chalice of everlasting salvation.
Vouchsafe to look upon them with a merciful and pleasant countenance; and to accept them, even as thou didst vouchsafe to accept the gifts of thy servant Abel the righteous, and the sacrifice of our patriarch Abraham; and the holy sacrifice, the immaculate victim, which they high priest Melschisedech offered unto thee.  

Bowing, with hands joined, he continues:

We humbly beseech thee, Almighty God, command these offerings to be brought by the hands of thy holy Angel to thine altar on high, in sight of thy divine majesty; that all we who at this partaking of the altar shall receive the most sacred Body and Blood of they Son,

He stands upright again and signs himself with the Sign of the Cross, saying:
may be fulfilled iwth all heavenly benediction and grace.

He joins his hands.
(Through the same Christ, our Lord. Amen.

Commemoration of the Dead

With hands extended, the Priest says:

Remember, also, o Lord, thy servants and handmaids, (N and N.), who have gone before us sealed with the seal of faith, and who sleep in the sleep of peace.

He joins his hands and prays briefly in silence for those who have died and for whom he intends to pray. Then, with hands extended, he continues:

To them, O Lord, and to all that rest in Christ, we beseech thee to grant the abode of refreshing, of light, and of peace.

He joins his hands.
 (Through the same Christ, our Lord. Amen.)

He strikes his breast with his right hand, saying:

To us sinner also, thy servants,

And with hands extended, he continues:

who hope in the multitude of thy mercies, vouchsafe to grant some part and fellowship with thy holy Apostles and Martyrs; with John, Stephen, Matthias,  Barnabas, Ignatius, Alexander, Marcellinus, Peter, Felicitas, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecilia, Anastasia and with all thy Saints: within whose fellowship, we beseech thee, admit us, not weighting our merit, but granting us forgiveness;

He joins his hands and continues:

Through Jesus Christ our Lord, through whom, O Lord, thou dost ever create all these good things; dost sanctify, quicken, bless, and bestow them upon us. 

He takes the Host and Chalice, and raising both, he says:

By whom and with whom, and in whom, to thee, O father Almighty, in the unity of the Holy Spriit, be all honour and glory throughout all ages, world without end.

The people respond: Amen

The People stand.

The Priest genuflects, rises, and continues with the Lord's Prayer.  

(My comment: Oddly enough, we in the Ordinary Form have maintained the exact Elizabethan English for the Lord's Prayer as is in the Ordinariate missal--HOW ODD IS THAT!!!!! Fortunately too, the Ordinariate's Lord's Prayer does not add immediately "for thine is the Kingdom" as the Anglicans or Episcopalians do.

They have though the embolism after it but vastly improved over ours:)

Deliver us, O Lord, we beseech thee, from all evils, past, present, and to come; and at the intercession of the blessed and glorious ever-Virgin Mary, Mother of god, with thy blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and with Andrew, and all the Saints, favourable grant peace in our days, that by the help of thine availing mercy we may ever both be free from sin and safe from all distress.

The Priest joins his hands. The People respond:

 For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen. 

 

CARDINAL ROBERT SARAH ISN'T YOUR FATHER'S BUGNINI/MARINI SCHOOL OF LITURGICAL INCULTURATION: HE TAKES ON AFRICAN LITURGIES THAT ARE OVER THE TOP! KEEP IN MIND AN AFRICAN IS DOING THIS!

Below this succinct summary  is a very, very rough translation of an article Cardinal Robert Sarah recently wrote in L'Osservatore Romano:
 
Writing in L’Osservatore Romano, the prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has stressed the importance of moments of silence in the liturgy.
“External silence is an ascetic exercise of mastery in the use of the word,” said Cardinal Robert Sarah, who contrasted the Marian silence of the one wishes to meditate on God’s word with the noise of the person who wishes to show off.

Quoting Sacred Scripture, the Second Vatican Council, the General Instruction of the Roman Missal, and Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger’s Spirit of the Liturgy, Cardinal Sarah said that “we must avoid transforming the church, which is the house of God intended for adoration, into a spectacle hall where you go to applaud the actors.”

Cardinal Sarah, who hails from Guinea, also criticized the “long and loud” offertory processions, “including endless dances, in some African countries. One has the impression of being present at a folklore exhibition.”

HERE IS THE COMPLETE TRANSLATION POORLY TRANSLATED FROM THE ORIGINAL ITALIAN IN L'OSSERVATORE ROMANO:

Many faithful complain rightly about the absence of silence in some forms of celebration of our liturgy. It is therefore important to remember-making the meaning of silence as a valuable Christian ascetic and as condition required for a deep prayer and contemplation, without forgetting- that in the celebration of the Holy Eucharist are official times provided times of silence, in order to highlight its importance for liturgical renewal that is authentic .In the negative sense, the silence is the absence of noise. The virtuous silence - or mystical silence - must be obviously distinct from silence that is reprehensible, by the refusal to address the word, from the silence of omission for cowardice, selfishness or hardness of heart. Of course the exterior silence is an ascetic exercise of being a patron in the use of the word.

Yes, it is in prayer that God communicates to us his life, i.e. manifests his presence in our souls by flushing with the waves of his love-Trinitarian King, the Father through the Son and in the Holy Spirit.
And the pre-ring is essentially silence. The Wisdom books of the Old Testament crammed exhortations times to avoid the sins of language (especially the slander and calumny).

The prophetic books encourage the silence as emotional expression of the reverential fear toward God; this is then a preparation for the theophany of God, that of-king to the revelation of his presence in our world.

James has put us on guard against the evil words, which are the expression of a heart and also against the idle words, of which we will have to render an account. The exterior noise instead shows the individual who wants to occupy a place too important, who wants to act or put on a show, or who wants to fill his inner emptiness.

In the Gospel it is said that the Savior King himself prayed in silence, throughout at or withdrew in desert places. The silence is typical of meditation of the word of God; it is found especially in the attitude of Mary; In the mystery of her Son. Silence is especially the attitude that is positive who prepares to welcome God through listening. Yes, God acts in silence. From here the important observation of St John of the Cross: "The Father has one word: it his Word, his son. It is only in silence that the soul can understood."

In certain moments, it is addressed to God, in other there is silence to listen to it. It is not surprising then that we should consider the silence as choir or of the faithful. The Latin Mass has absolute silence. The Council has maintained a time of silence. So the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy Sacrosanctum Concilium, at number 30 has decreed that "to promote active participation it is also observed, in due time, a sacred silence”.

"Its nature depends on the time it occurs in celebrations. Thus, during the penitential act and after the call to prayer, silence helps there commendations; after reading or the homily is a reminder to meditate on what has been heard; after the communion, fosters prayer of praise and supplication.
Even before the same celebration is beneficial to observe silence in the Church, in the sacristy and in the place where the vestments are and on the premises outside-Yes, because everyone can prepare devoutly and in righteous ways to the sacred celebration". Silence therefore is not absent from the ordinary form of the Roman Missal, at least if you follow-no its requirements and we take our inspiration from its recommendations. In addition, outside of the homily, we must banish any speech or presentation of people during the celebration of the holy mass. In fact all must be invited to transform the Church, which is the house of God destined to adoration, in a room to show where it goes to applaud actors more or less good according to their capacity more or less large to communicate, according to an expression that feels like what we see in the media. We must strive to understand the motivation of this discipline liturgy on silence and. Other authors particularly qualification can help us in this ambit and be able to convince us of the need of silence in the liturgy.

First place Monsignor Guido Marini, Master of the celebrations for  pontifical liturgies, which expresses the principle in these terms: a liturgy "well celebrated with the language that is proper, in its various parts, must provide for a happy alternation of silence and the spoken word, where silence animates the word, permitting the voice to resonate with extraordinary depth, maintaining every vocal expression in the right climate of recollection. It is to be considered rather as a real ritual moment, complementary to the word, to saying, singing, gesture ".

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, in his famous work the spirit of liturgy, stated that "the great mystery that surpasses every word there in-life to silence. And the silence also belongs to the liturgy. It is necessary that this silence was pie-no, that is not simply as-without speech or action. What we expect from the liturgy is that gives us this substantial silence, positive, in which we find ourselves. A silence that is not a pause in which a thousand thoughts and desires beset us, but a collection that brings us inner peace, which leaves us to breathe and discover the es-essential part".

It is therefore a silence wherein look simple-mind God, wherein let God we look and we wrap in the mystery f his majesty and of his love. Always Cardinal Ratzinger mentioned some moments of silence details. Here is an example:"also the moment of the offertory you can play in silence. This practice in fact is suited to the preparation of the gifts and can only be fruitful, provided that the preparation is conceived not only as an external action, necessary for the performance of the liturgy, but also as a path essentially interior; this is to unite to the sacrifice that Jesus Christ offers to the Father". Must be decried in this sense the processions of offers, long and noisy, which include endless dances, in African countries. It has the impression to attend folk-like ceremony that distorts the bloody sacrifice of Christ on the Cross and we are far from the Eucharistic mystery. We must therefore insist on the silence laity during the Eucharistic Prayer, as pointed out by Monsignor Guido Marini: "That silence does not mean inactivity or lack of participation. That silence tends to allow everyone to enter in the act of love with which Jesus offers himself to the Father on the cross for the salvation of the world. That silence, truly sacred, is the liturgical space in which to say yes, with all the strength of our being, to the action of Christ, so that it becomes also our action in daily life.

THE ORDINATION OF BISHOP STEVEN J. LOPES: THE GOOD, BAD AND UGLY: YES, LET ME REITERATE, THE ORDINARIATE'S GLORIOUS NEW "DIVINE WORSHIP, THE MISSAL" IS SUPERIOR TO THE ORDINARY FORM IN LANGUAGE, CALENDAR AND FORMAT OF THE MISSAL BUT A BIT TOO WORDY IN THE ANGLICAN TRADITION



The setting for the ordination of Bishop Lopes as the first Ordinariate bishop in the USA and Canada was nice but the somewhat modern Co-Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Houston could have done this, that or the other to make it more suitable for the Ordinariate new Missal and style of Mass.

The Cathedral's altar arrangement could have been made traditional. Instead it maintained the 1970's approach of having floor candles flank the sanctuary, not the altar thus cluttering the sanctuary and missing the point of the candles in their traditional arrangement. Simply placing six large candles on the altar with a central crucifix and allowing this Mass to be ad orientem would have solved the problem or if facing the people placing the candles near the altar.

The Introductory Rite had a very beautiful but way too triumphal sounding processional hymn for the many cardinals, bishops and priests. This is a post-Vatican II tendency to add triumphalism to the Ordinary Form Mass with trumpet flairs, tympani and majesty. The clergy should enter to more sober sounds in keeping with Gregorian or Anglican chant.

The Official Introit in the EF format but in English was magnificent and a relief from the triumphal processional hymn and shows that a Gregorian Chant sound in English works very, very well. The choir was magnificent.

Then, after the Introit the liturgical corruption found only in the Ordinary Form occurred with Cardinal Dinardo giving a lenghty and unnecessary welcome to everyone and naming the important actors/cardinals and bishops. This is not necessary and is rightly a corruption. Pope Francis seems to have done a way with this at papal Mass outside of Rome allowing it only after Holy Communion. IT IS NOT NEEDED!!!! IT INTERRUPTS THE TRAJECTORY OF PRAYER BEGUN BY THE HYMN AND INTROIT. STOP IT AND STOP IT NOW!

Cardinal Gerhardt Muller was the celebrant and his English is wonderful even the Elizabethan English.

The Introductory Rite followed the Anglican Tradition which then went into the Kyrie in Anglican Style, Gloria and then "The Lord be with you" followed by the Collect.

The Gospel was proclaimed from the middle of the nave, an Anglican tradition and nicely executed.

The Rite of Ordination followed the Ordinary Form's version and was nicely done beginning with the Litany of Saints.

The Liturgy of the Eucharist with the new bishop as celebrant used the EF's Offertory Prayers. The Bishop kissed the altar in all the places it is kissed in the EF. 

The Roman Canon in Elizabethan English was magnificent and elevates the prayer in reverence and is a sign of elevated language use to address God, far superior to our gloriously new English translation. I am sold on the Elizabethan English as pseudo Latin!  

The double genuflections at the elevations was magnificent as was the genuflection after the Per Ipsum.

I loved the three-fold "Lord I am not worthy." It works well and ties it into the three-fold Lamb of God.

THE ORDINARIATE'S MISSAL IS WHAT POPE BENEDICT ENVISIONED AS A REFORM OF THE REFORM. BRING IT TO THE ENTIRE CHURCH, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, POPE FRANCIS!

I BELIEVE IT WILL BE GIVEN TO THE ENTIRE CHURCH AND I PRAY THAT ANY LATIN RITE PRIEST SHOULD BE ABLE TO USE THE ORDINARIATE'S ORDER OF THE MASS AND MISSAL. 

TO SEE CARDINALS MUELLER, WUREL AND MAHONEY PRAYING THE OLD ELIZABETHAN ENGLISH AND CONCELEBRATING THE MASS WITH EF SENSIBILITIES AND ORDER WAS BEYOND REAL!  I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR THEIR HONEST OPINION ON THE NEW AND GLORIOUS ORDINARIATE'S "DIVINE WORSHIP, THE MISSAL!"





Tuesday, February 2, 2016

LIVE VIDEO LINK TO EWTN FOR TONIGHT'S PERSONAL ORDINARIATE ORDINATION OF A BISHOP AT 8 PM EST; 7 PM CST!

The Mass of Ordination of Bishop-elect Steven J. Lopes will broadcast live on EWTN on Feb. 2, 2016 from 7 to 9:30 p.m. CST or 8 to 10:30 PM EST.

Please encourage your friends and loved ones who cannot attend the Mass of Ordination in Houston to check their local cable provider’s schedule for access to this historic liturgy!

Don't  subscribe to EWTN? Download the app and view the Mass on your tablet.